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Napoleon and his Staff by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier. (XX) - Napoleon-Prints.com


Napoleon and his Staff by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier. (XX)


Napoleon and his Staff by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier. (XX)

Painted in 1868, Napoleon wears the uniform of the Chasseurs and is followed by his generals and an Egyptian Marmaluke (extreme left) Added, it was said, at the express wish of Lord Hereford who purchased the painting. It is now in the Wallace Collection.
Item Code : DHM0232XXNapoleon and his Staff by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier. (XX) - This Edition
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Open edition print.

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Image size 23 inches x 21 inches (58cm x 53cm)none
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Other editions of this item : Napoleon and his Staff by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.DHM0232
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PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 23 inches x 21 inches (58cm x 53cm)none£30 Off!
Supplied with one or more  free art prints!
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**Open edition print. (One print reduced to clear)

Damage/marks on border and a number of handling dents on image.
Image size 23 inches x 21 inches (58cm x 53cm)noneHalf
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