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Retour De L Ile D Elbe by Charles August Guillaume Steuben. - Napoleon-Prints.com


Retour De L Ile D Elbe by Charles August Guillaume Steuben.


Retour De L Ile D Elbe by Charles August Guillaume Steuben.

Item Code : DHM0128Retour De L Ile D Elbe by Charles August Guillaume Steuben. - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 30 inches x 21 inches (76cm x 53cm)noneHalf
Price!

Supplied with one or more free  art prints!
Now : £40.00

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FREE PRINT : Bonaparte au Pont DArcole by Antoine-Jean Gros (B)

This complimentary art print worth £14
(Size : 9 inches x 12 inches (28cm x 31cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

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Les Adieux de Fontainebleau by Horace Vernet.
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Other editions of this item : Retour De L Ile D Elbe by Charles August Guillaume Steuben DHM0128
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£15.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 40 inches x 30 inches (102cm x 76cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £300.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 22 inches (76cm x 56cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £200.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 26 inches (91cm x 66cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £250.00VIEW EDITION...

This Week's Half Price Art

Painted in the year of his death (1821) with the floating plank inscribed with the names of 10 of his battles, the last being Waterloo.
The Apotheusis of Napoleon by Horace Vernet.
Half Price! - £38.00
Battle fought in Algeria on 24th November 1836 depicting Marshall Clauzel Gegen Constantine leading the French troops.
Battle of Somah by Horace Vernet (GL)
Half Price! - £250.00
 An SAS team is picked up by a U.S. Army Special Forces Blackhawk helicopter after a successful operation against the Taliban.

Extraction - Afghanistan 2011 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
French infantry struggle to defend a large gateway from the onslaught of the Prussian Infantry during the Franco - Prussian war.
La Defence de la Longbayau by Alphonse De Neuville.
Half Price! - £30.00

Cruiser Tanks of 1st Royal Tank Regiment at the Battle of Beda Fomm.  6th February 1941: My friend Lt Col G Vesey Holt RTR has always considered that the deeds of 1 RTR at Beda Fomm have been neglected. To put this right he commissioned me to do a painting which he then presented to his Regiment. He obtained copies of the Regiment's War Diary. I was also greatly assisted by the staff of the Tank Museum, Bovington, which has examples of these tanks on display. On 6th February 1941, a column of Italian tanks and transport vehicles was proceeding southwards along the Benghasi-Tripoli road. In the late afternoon, B squadron engaged the enemy at about 500 yards from a hull down position behind a ridge, while five or six Cruisers of A Squadron crossed the road and proceeded south amongst the Italian column, firing on the transport and guns. It was raining heavily and visibility was poor.  The scene was littered with burning wreckage of Italian M13 tank and lorries. At about 1720 hours visibility became so bad that it was almost impossible to distinguish between friend and foe, and the tanks withdrew to re-group. No British tank was destroyed, though one was left damaged.  A Squadron is indicated by the triangle on the turrets, (red for the senior regiment in the brigade). An A9 is closest, with an A10 beyond. Commanders were almost invariably visible with their hatches open. The pennants on the antenna were a recognition sign, worn at different heights which changed daily. The white circle on a red square was the sign of 7th Armoured Division. The regiment's unit code sign was a white 24 on a red square. At this period British tanks had the multi-coloured diagonally striped pattern of camouflage.  The Cruiser A9 (Mark 1) had one 2-pounder gun and one .303-in. Vickers machine-gun mounted co-axially in the main turret, and one .303-in. Vickers mg in each of the two auxiliary turrets.  The Cruiser A10 (Mark 1A) had one 2-pounder gun and two 7.92-mm Besa machine-guns.

The Battle of Beda Fomm by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
On 25th April 1951, Lieutenant John Mole, in command of the remaining section of the Royal Ulster Rifles 3 inch mortars, dismounted in the open and replied with rapid mortar fire on to the slopes from which a hail of machine-gun fire swept the valley floor. The surviving tanks of C Squadron the 8th Kings Royal Irish Hussars kept up a heavy fire on the Chinese formations swarming down the valley slopes.

The Battle of Imjin, Crash Action by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
1st Battalion The Duke of Wellingtons Regiment.  Operation TELIC, April 2003.
Patrol in Az Zubayr, Iraq by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Banikju, Northern Helmand, Afghanistan, 2007. A team from 42 Royal Marines Commando break into a suspected hostile compound during <i>Operation Volcano</i>.

The Hole in the Wall Gang by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

 Ayrton Senna in his #27 car on his way to winning the 1990 Monaco Grand Prix, leading the Tyrell of Jean Alesi and the McLaren of Gerhard Berger out of Mirabeau and into the Station Hairpin.  The historic number 27, made famous by Gilles Villeneuve at Ferrari, had been adopted by McLaren for the start of the 1990 season after Ferrari took the numbers 1 and 2 for their cars.  Senna won the 1990 word championship in this car, but never drove the 27 car again after switching to number 1 for the next season.

Senna at Monaco by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
B46. Damon Hill/ Williams FW.16 by Ivan Berryman
Damon Hill/ Williams FW.16 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £45.00
 Jacques Villeneuve.

The Maple Leaf Maestro by Stuart Coffield
Half Price! - £20.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00

This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

 With the departure of No 1 Group in May 1943, No 4 Group's 78 Sqn Halifaxes arrived at Breighton in Yorkshire from where they would continue to operate until the end of the war.  Halifax III LW291 (EY-M) is depicted snowbound in the Winter of 1944, not long before it was lost over Grossmutz whilst taking part on a raid on Berlin on 20th January 1944. <br><br>Crew of EY-M : <br><br>Pilot : Flight Sergeant F Moffat RCAF (killed),<br>Navigator : Flying Officer W McGreggor RCAF (killed),<br>Bomb Aimer : Flying Officer R Selman RCAF (killed),<br>Wireless Operator : Flight Sergeant H H Bennett (taken prisoner),<br>Flight Engineer : Sergeant N Legg (killed),<br>Rear Gunner : Sergeant W Ruelhoff (killed,<br>Mid-Upper Gunner : Sergeant J Stewart (killed).

White-out at Breighton - Tribute to No.78 Squadron by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 No World War 1 pilot is better known than Manfred Von Richthofen, the Red Baron, and few pilots were greater exponents of the little Fokker DR.1 Triplane in which he scored nineteen of his eighty victories. In fact, only one of the DR.1s flown by von Richthofen was painted all-over Red. In April 1918, 127/17 was his mount, this machine being depicted here shortly after take off in company with other Jasta 11 pilots of his notorious Flying Circus. Among this formation are: Ltn Eberhardt Mohnicke, Ltn Hans Joachim Wolff, Rittm Manfred von Richthofen and his brother Ltn Lothar von Richthofen. The Flying Circus soubriquet was appended by the British and Canadian forces and was never used by von Richthofen or Jasta 11 themselves, but the sight of the red-nosed Triplanes as they joined battle in the skies above France signaled to Allied pilots a tough battle ahead.

Von Richthofens Flying Circus by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Arriving in France in 1917 with little or no air gunnery training behind him, Captain Arthur Harry Cobby went on to become the Australian Flying Corps highest scoring ace with 29 victories to his credit, five of them observation balloons. He is shown here in Sopwith Camel E1416 of 4 Sqn AFC (formerly 71 Sqn AFC) having downed one of his final victims, a Fokker D.VII on 4th September 1918. Cobby survived the Great War and served in the RAAF during the inter war period and World War Two, eventually leaving the service as Air Commodore CBE. He died in 1955.

Captain Arthur Henry Cobby by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IXs of 402 Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force, based at Kenley, practise combat manoeuvres in the skies above Kent in May, 1943.

Spitfire Alley by Ivan Berryman. (H)
Half Price! - £80.00

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